Norway / Cyprus: Family of missing Marie get Oslo court backing


marie-3

source

The family of Marie Eleni Grimsrud – the young girl who was snatched by her estranged father and who is still missing – have succeeded in getting a court in Norway to recognise her case as an abduction.

The ruling in the Scandinavian country is seen by legal experts as a blow to the efforts of her father – 49-year-old Leif Torkel Grimsrud – to take her legally back to Norway. Legal representatives of the mother had made the motion at the Oslo District Court.

Four-year-old Marie was abducted on April 27 as her mother, 43-year-old Greek Cypriot Lena Ioannou, was dropping her off at nursery in Nicosia. Police say the father had orchestrated the abduction and an international arrest warrant is out against him.

Several people had been arrested at the time but have since been released due to lack of evidence.

Related stories:

Back in July, investigators in Cyprus had said that the six-year-old girl had been sighted with her father on a boat at the Antalya marina in Turkey.

“If Marie is sighted in Norway, then the authorities there will be forced to intervene and get her returned safely to her mother in Cyprus,” said Laris Vrahimis – the lawyer representing the mother in Cyprus.

“We believe we know where Marie is, but we will not be making that knowledge public. We are doing everything we can to get her back.”

If you have any questions or concerns regarding parental abduction to or from Cyprus or Norway feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

USA: Orono mom found dead with 5-year-old son left suicide note lamenting custody rift


1504734901_100969211orono090717

source

An Orono woman discovered dead with her 5-year-old son Monday left a suicide note lamenting her long-running court battle with the father over custody that ended with them having joint parenting rights, according to a search warrant filed Wednesday.

Police have called the hangings of Gina Ilene Summers, 46, and her son Jude a murder-suicide. It appears to follow a lengthy custody dispute between Summers and the boy’s father, 51-year-old Jeff Sandberg, of Minnetonka.

Officers first stopped by the home Monday, after Sandberg notified police that he could not reach anyone there to arrange for picking up his son at 5 p.m., Police Chief Correy Farniok said. Summers and Sandberg have joint custody of the boy.

The home was locked and no one answered the door, Farniok said. Sandberg was advised to call back later if the situation remained the same, the chief said.

After the father called again, a relative who lived nearby and had keys let police in about 8 p.m. That’s when the bodies were found in the basement and a preliminary determination of murder-suicide was made, the chief said.

Summers’ typed and signed note, which was discovered nearby, “talked about prior domestic abuse and issues with the system and allowing a child to be ripped from his mother,” and it ended with, “Don’t let this happen to another child and mother.”

Sandberg released a statement late Thursday through his attorney pointing out how he went from enjoying a family fishing trip a week ago to the Boundary Waters with his 5-year-old son and others to now “planning the funeral for Jude, murdered by his mother, Gina Summers, when he was getting ready for his first day of Ready Start Kindergarten.”

Sandberg challenged the mother’s allegations, writing that Summers “since the onset of the case in January 2015 when she falsely accused the father of domestic abuse, never missed an opportunity to disrupt the established father-son relationship, both inside and outside of the Family Court paternity proceedings.”

He said Summers traumatized him and his family over the past 2½ years with “her actions and inactions, including her scheduling of multiple motions before the court, not only before but also after the trial, and subsequently to the Court of Appeals, and her absolute refusal to participate in ordered mediation.”

Police searched Summers’ house and found documents, including court and mental health papers. A camera system was also installed at the property.

According to court documents in their disputes over Jude’s custody and care, Summers and Sandberg began a romantic relationship in 2008, and the next year discussed having a child through in vitro fertilization. After several failed pregnancy attempts, Jude was born in August 2012.

By July 2015, the relationship had become toxic. Summers received an order for protection against Sandberg, saying he had been physically abusing her since 2009. That petition was eventually settled and dismissed.

But the two continued to fight over the pregnancy costs and how to care for the boy. They filed court motions against one another over which school district he should attend. On Friday, Hennepin County District Judge Edward Wahl ruled in Sandberg’s favor.

The court records include many of the boy’s report cards, pictures and assessments. His preschool teacher wrote that the boy is “doing great in class! He is such a smiley and loving boy!”

Summers worked as a Realtor in the west metro. In an online biography, she spoke at length about activities with her son, that ranged “from reading to painting, from racing cars to swimming with them, from gardening to building, all ball sports, and not to mention teaching him to downhill ski at 17 months old; the list of fun goes

If you have any questions or concerns regarding parental alienation feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

Ireland: Heartbroken Irish dad says family’s lives have been ‘shattered’ since son was abducted three years ago


source

Jeremy O’Connor hasn’t seen his ex wife or his son since 2014

A heartbroken dad who hasn’t hugged his son since he was abducted three years ago says the lives of his family have been “shattered”.

Jeremy O’Connor drove his ex-wife Yolandie Botha and their then four-year-old boy Joshua to the airport for a month-long holiday to South Africa in 2014 – and hasn’t seen either of them since.

The 48-year-old, from Navan, Co Meath, contacted the authorities to report the parental child abduction and said he was told a court case would be held within a year under the Hague Convention.

However, three years on Jeremy, who has three other children, still awaits a court case to get his son back.

Although he Skypes Joshua, now seven, regularly, he hasn’t held him in three years and is worried his son is beginning to forget his relatives.

Jeremy said: “Under the Hague Convention, a parental child abduction case is expedited in under a year to avoid a child becoming settled in another country.”

But South African authorities have deferred court hearings three times, with no new date given.

Jeremy, who works in sales, added: “Yolandie and I split amicably after being together a number of years.

“I had absolutely no problem with her taking Joshua to South Africa for a month-long holiday to see her family.

“I signed the necessary consent forms and even drove them to the airport. That was the last time I saw my son.

“She contacted me before she was due to return to tell me they weren’t coming back.”

Jeremy says that under access rights, he is allowed to contact Joshua through online video chats.

He said: “I Skype him regularly but haven’t seen him in over three years. I also have other children who miss him dreadfully and he has missed out on a lot of family occasions.

“I was really close to Joshua when he was here and now I only see him on a screen. I can’t even hug him.

“My mother – his grandmother – Skyped him the other day and he didn’t know who she was.

“She was devastated and cried no end. I feel failed by the South African authorities.

“They haven’t appointed me a solicitor and every court date has been deferred.”

Jeremy now fears, due to the length of time elapsed, a court might rule Joshua is settled in South Africa and it would be an upheaval to move him.

Jeremy O’Connor and his son Joshua.

He said: “He has Irish citizenship, he was taken wrongfully out of this country and I should have had him back at least two years ago, if the justice system worked properly.”

Jeremy has now decided to talk about his plight publicly as he feels all other routes failed.

He added: “I’m stuck in this limbo for ever and it gets worse and worse everyday.

“A lot of lives have been shattered by this and I’m desperate to try and get some kind of help.”

An Irish Department of Justice spokesperson said: “The 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (“the Convention”) is a treaty between states that was set up to protect
children subjected to situations of international child abduction.

“It aims to return children to the state where they usually lived prior to their wrongful removal, so the courts can make decisions in relation to matters of custody and/or access.

“The Convention also allows left behind parents to seek to establish access rights to their children. The Convention has been agreed to by over 90 countries, including Ireland, and it has been given the full force of the law in Ireland.”

When contacted by the Irish Mirror yesterday, Yolandie said she was not allowed to talk about the case.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding a child abducted to or from Ireland please feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

 

India: Child abduction law may cover women’s interests


The aim is to put adequate safeguards to protect NRI parents, especially women, who remove a child from the lawful custody of their spouse.

source

mother-and-child-shutterstock_7d4ebab0-7876-11e7-930d-20ef51ded0a4

An NRI woman should have the right to refuse the return of her child to the spouse, from whom she separated on grounds of domestic violence, a high-level panel examining a draft law on civil aspects of International Child Abduction bill is likely to suggest.

Sources in the committee said they were considering introducing the option with an aim to put adequate safeguards to protect NRI parents, especially women, who remove a child from the lawful custody of their spouse.

India can become a signatory to the Hague convention on civil aspects of international child abduction only after a domestic law is in place. Signing the treaty will make inter-parental child abduction an offence punishable with one-year jail.

The Justice Rajesh Bindal -led panel is of the view that in draft law, domestic violence should be made a ground for refusing the return of child to the lawful custody of their spouse from whom they have been separated.

“Many countries, who are signatory to the treaty, have this clause in their domestic law. If a woman says she faces a risk of domestic violence, the government can stop the child from being sent back. We are seeing if this can be part of our domestic law also,” said a panel member on the condition of anonymity.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding a child abducted to or from India please feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

Spain: Plight of Juana Rivas, a mother-of-two and abuse victim shakes Spain


juana_ravis

source

MADRID: The plight of a Spanish woman who vanished with her children after defying a court order to hand them over to her Italian ex-partner, found guilty of domestic violence, has shaken the country.

The case burst into the limelight this week just as lawmakers agreed a series of measures to tackle abuse against women, in a country that has made the struggle against domestic violence a priority.

Juana Rivas, a woman in her mid-30s from Maracena in southern Spain, was living in Italy with her partner when she took both their sons, aged 3 and 11, away in May 2016 and never returned, alleging abuse.

According to the Maracena municipal women’s centre which is representing her, she had suffered “psychological and physical violence.”

Her ex-partner, who was found guilty of abusing her in 2009, filed a complaint for child abduction, according to Andalusia’s high court, which oversees all courts in the southern region including the one that has dealt with the case.

In an interview with Italy’s Ansa news agency, he denied any violence. “I want to be able to hold my children again in my arms, I haven’t seen them since last year,” he said.

A Spanish court subsequently decided the children should return to Italy, arguing among other things that the eldest boy was evaluated by psychologists and did not show any indication of not wanting to see his father.

Rivas appealed but this was rejected and the court ordered her to hand over the children on Wednesday, July 26.

‘Defend them’
Footage of Rivas earlier this week showed her in tears as she appealed to the media.

“If they want to steal them from me, I will defend them until my last breath,” she told reporters.

On Wednesday, she never turned up and has remained in hiding ever since with her children.

The case has sparked an outpouring of support for Rivas, not only from fellow residents in Maracena, but further afield in Spain.

Netizens have taken to Twitter to pledge their support with the hashtags #Juanaestaenmicasa (Juana is in my house) or #YoSoyJuana (I am Juana) and a petition launched on Change.org in December 2016 has garnered more than 208,000 signatures.

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy told reporters “you have to put yourself in the place of this mother” when asked about the case.

“She had to go live in Italy, come back, she’s been assaulted twice, her husband was sentenced by the courts,” he said.

But in the Ansa interview, her ex-partner accused her of organising a media campaign against him.

The court in charge of the case has ordered both parties to appear at a hearing on August 8 to decide how to proceed.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding a child abducted to or from Spain please feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

Canada: Teen charged in abduction


screen_shot_2017-07-12_at_12-21-54_pm_p3235055

source

Police say a Saskatchewan girl abducted from a playground last week was dropped off in a wooded area outside Prince Albert.

Insp. Jason Stonechild says the eight year old walked from the woods to a nearby farm.

“RCMP officers and members from our service immediately attended to this farmyard, where officers were able to confirm that we had located our subject of the Amber Alert,” Stonechild said Wednesday. “The victim was immediately taken to Victoria Hospital by our members for proper assessment.”

An Amber Alert was issued July 4 after the girl disappeared from a Prince Albert school playground.

Police said the girl was playing by herself when a man entered the park. He grabbed her and put her into the back seat of his car. She was found several hours later.

While police were at the farmyard, they received a call from a business in Prince Albert saying they had someone matching the suspect’s description, Stonechild said. Officers arrested the suspect without incident.

Jared John Charles, 19, is facing numerous charges, including kidnapping, forcible confinement, sexual assault and abandoning a child.

f you have any questions or concerns regarding a child abducted to, or from Canada please feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)

Canada: Police issue safety tips


1297965878169_original

source

Two people have been charged after a child was abducted in Elliot Lake.

In a release, the East Algoma Ontario Provincial Police said officers got a call Saturday about “a non-custodial abduction in the Elliot Lake area.”

The suspects appeared Sunday in the Ontario Court of Justice bail court in Sault Ste. Marie. Police are saying little else about the case.

“In order to protect the identity of the children involved, no further information will be provided,”‘ police said. “However, police would like to take this opportunity to remind parents and/or guardians the importance of safety with their children.”

Safety tips for children passed on by police include:

– Know your name, address and phone number(s).

– Learn how and when to call 911.

– If you are scared of someone, run to safety.

– It’s OK to be rude to a grown-up if you feel you are unsafe.

– Learn the difference between an “OK” secret and a “not OK” secret, and beware of an adult that asks you to keep a secret from parents or your guardian.

– Have a “Call List” and know how and when to use it.

– Don’t let anyone on the phone or at the door know that you are home alone.

– If you ever get lost in a mall, ask the closest store clerk for help and then stay where you are until you are found.

– Avoid shortcuts when you are walking from one place to another.

– If you are ever “scooped,” scream, kick, bite and fight as hard as you can to get away. Never trust what the “scooper” tells you.

– Tell your parents or a trusted adult if someone is asking you to do something that makes you feel uncomfortable. Listen to your “Uh Oh” voice.

– Always ask your parents for permission before getting on the Internet.

– Never talk to people online without your parent’s permission.

– As for parents/guardians, work hard to establish trust and communication with your children. Ensure you know how to find them at all times.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding an abducted child please feel free to contact us 24 / 7.  We are always available at contact@abpworld.com or by calling our offices – +1 (805) CHILD-11 (+18052445311)